This repository contains docker and docker-compose files to simulate the infrastructure required by gnuviechadmin components.
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  1. # Redis configuration file example.
  2. #
  3. # Note that in order to read the configuration file, Redis must be
  4. # started with the file path as first argument:
  5. #
  6. # ./redis-server /path/to/redis.conf
  7. # Note on units: when memory size is needed, it is possible to specify
  8. # it in the usual form of 1k 5GB 4M and so forth:
  9. #
  10. # 1k => 1000 bytes
  11. # 1kb => 1024 bytes
  12. # 1m => 1000000 bytes
  13. # 1mb => 1024*1024 bytes
  14. # 1g => 1000000000 bytes
  15. # 1gb => 1024*1024*1024 bytes
  16. #
  17. # units are case insensitive so 1GB 1Gb 1gB are all the same.
  18. ################################## INCLUDES ###################################
  19. # Include one or more other config files here. This is useful if you
  20. # have a standard template that goes to all Redis servers but also need
  21. # to customize a few per-server settings. Include files can include
  22. # other files, so use this wisely.
  23. #
  24. # Notice option "include" won't be rewritten by command "CONFIG REWRITE"
  25. # from admin or Redis Sentinel. Since Redis always uses the last processed
  26. # line as value of a configuration directive, you'd better put includes
  27. # at the beginning of this file to avoid overwriting config change at runtime.
  28. #
  29. # If instead you are interested in using includes to override configuration
  30. # options, it is better to use include as the last line.
  31. #
  32. # include /path/to/local.conf
  33. # include /path/to/other.conf
  34. ################################## NETWORK #####################################
  35. # By default, if no "bind" configuration directive is specified, Redis listens
  36. # for connections from all the network interfaces available on the server.
  37. # It is possible to listen to just one or multiple selected interfaces using
  38. # the "bind" configuration directive, followed by one or more IP addresses.
  39. #
  40. # Examples:
  41. #
  42. # bind 192.168.1.100 10.0.0.1
  43. # bind 127.0.0.1 ::1
  44. #
  45. # ~~~ WARNING ~~~ If the computer running Redis is directly exposed to the
  46. # internet, binding to all the interfaces is dangerous and will expose the
  47. # instance to everybody on the internet. So by default we uncomment the
  48. # following bind directive, that will force Redis to listen only into
  49. # the IPv4 lookback interface address (this means Redis will be able to
  50. # accept connections only from clients running into the same computer it
  51. # is running).
  52. #
  53. # IF YOU ARE SURE YOU WANT YOUR INSTANCE TO LISTEN TO ALL THE INTERFACES
  54. # JUST COMMENT THE FOLLOWING LINE.
  55. # ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  56. #bind 127.0.0.1
  57. # Protected mode is a layer of security protection, in order to avoid that
  58. # Redis instances left open on the internet are accessed and exploited.
  59. #
  60. # When protected mode is on and if:
  61. #
  62. # 1) The server is not binding explicitly to a set of addresses using the
  63. # "bind" directive.
  64. # 2) No password is configured.
  65. #
  66. # The server only accepts connections from clients connecting from the
  67. # IPv4 and IPv6 loopback addresses 127.0.0.1 and ::1, and from Unix domain
  68. # sockets.
  69. #
  70. # By default protected mode is enabled. You should disable it only if
  71. # you are sure you want clients from other hosts to connect to Redis
  72. # even if no authentication is configured, nor a specific set of interfaces
  73. # are explicitly listed using the "bind" directive.
  74. protected-mode yes
  75. # Accept connections on the specified port, default is 6379 (IANA #815344).
  76. # If port 0 is specified Redis will not listen on a TCP socket.
  77. port 6379
  78. # TCP listen() backlog.
  79. #
  80. # In high requests-per-second environments you need an high backlog in order
  81. # to avoid slow clients connections issues. Note that the Linux kernel
  82. # will silently truncate it to the value of /proc/sys/net/core/somaxconn so
  83. # make sure to raise both the value of somaxconn and tcp_max_syn_backlog
  84. # in order to get the desired effect.
  85. tcp-backlog 511
  86. # Unix socket.
  87. #
  88. # Specify the path for the Unix socket that will be used to listen for
  89. # incoming connections. There is no default, so Redis will not listen
  90. # on a unix socket when not specified.
  91. #
  92. # unixsocket /var/run/redis/redis.sock
  93. # unixsocketperm 700
  94. # Close the connection after a client is idle for N seconds (0 to disable)
  95. timeout 0
  96. # TCP keepalive.
  97. #
  98. # If non-zero, use SO_KEEPALIVE to send TCP ACKs to clients in absence
  99. # of communication. This is useful for two reasons:
  100. #
  101. # 1) Detect dead peers.
  102. # 2) Take the connection alive from the point of view of network
  103. # equipment in the middle.
  104. #
  105. # On Linux, the specified value (in seconds) is the period used to send ACKs.
  106. # Note that to close the connection the double of the time is needed.
  107. # On other kernels the period depends on the kernel configuration.
  108. #
  109. # A reasonable value for this option is 300 seconds, which is the new
  110. # Redis default starting with Redis 3.2.1.
  111. tcp-keepalive 300
  112. ################################# GENERAL #####################################
  113. # By default Redis does not run as a daemon. Use 'yes' if you need it.
  114. # Note that Redis will write a pid file in /var/run/redis.pid when daemonized.
  115. daemonize no
  116. # If you run Redis from upstart or systemd, Redis can interact with your
  117. # supervision tree. Options:
  118. # supervised no - no supervision interaction
  119. # supervised upstart - signal upstart by putting Redis into SIGSTOP mode
  120. # supervised systemd - signal systemd by writing READY=1 to $NOTIFY_SOCKET
  121. # supervised auto - detect upstart or systemd method based on
  122. # UPSTART_JOB or NOTIFY_SOCKET environment variables
  123. # Note: these supervision methods only signal "process is ready."
  124. # They do not enable continuous liveness pings back to your supervisor.
  125. supervised no
  126. # If a pid file is specified, Redis writes it where specified at startup
  127. # and removes it at exit.
  128. #
  129. # When the server runs non daemonized, no pid file is created if none is
  130. # specified in the configuration. When the server is daemonized, the pid file
  131. # is used even if not specified, defaulting to "/var/run/redis.pid".
  132. #
  133. # Creating a pid file is best effort: if Redis is not able to create it
  134. # nothing bad happens, the server will start and run normally.
  135. pidfile /var/run/redis/redis-server.pid
  136. # Specify the server verbosity level.
  137. # This can be one of:
  138. # debug (a lot of information, useful for development/testing)
  139. # verbose (many rarely useful info, but not a mess like the debug level)
  140. # notice (moderately verbose, what you want in production probably)
  141. # warning (only very important / critical messages are logged)
  142. loglevel verbose
  143. # Specify the log file name. Also the empty string can be used to force
  144. # Redis to log on the standard output. Note that if you use standard
  145. # output for logging but daemonize, logs will be sent to /dev/null
  146. logfile /var/log/redis/redis-server.log
  147. # To enable logging to the system logger, just set 'syslog-enabled' to yes,
  148. # and optionally update the other syslog parameters to suit your needs.
  149. # syslog-enabled no
  150. # Specify the syslog identity.
  151. # syslog-ident redis
  152. # Specify the syslog facility. Must be USER or between LOCAL0-LOCAL7.
  153. # syslog-facility local0
  154. # Set the number of databases. The default database is DB 0, you can select
  155. # a different one on a per-connection basis using SELECT <dbid> where
  156. # dbid is a number between 0 and 'databases'-1
  157. databases 1
  158. ################################ SNAPSHOTTING ################################
  159. #
  160. # Save the DB on disk:
  161. #
  162. # save <seconds> <changes>
  163. #
  164. # Will save the DB if both the given number of seconds and the given
  165. # number of write operations against the DB occurred.
  166. #
  167. # In the example below the behaviour will be to save:
  168. # after 900 sec (15 min) if at least 1 key changed
  169. # after 300 sec (5 min) if at least 10 keys changed
  170. # after 60 sec if at least 10000 keys changed
  171. #
  172. # Note: you can disable saving completely by commenting out all "save" lines.
  173. #
  174. # It is also possible to remove all the previously configured save
  175. # points by adding a save directive with a single empty string argument
  176. # like in the following example:
  177. #
  178. # save ""
  179. save 900 1
  180. save 300 10
  181. save 60 10000
  182. # By default Redis will stop accepting writes if RDB snapshots are enabled
  183. # (at least one save point) and the latest background save failed.
  184. # This will make the user aware (in a hard way) that data is not persisting
  185. # on disk properly, otherwise chances are that no one will notice and some
  186. # disaster will happen.
  187. #
  188. # If the background saving process will start working again Redis will
  189. # automatically allow writes again.
  190. #
  191. # However if you have setup your proper monitoring of the Redis server
  192. # and persistence, you may want to disable this feature so that Redis will
  193. # continue to work as usual even if there are problems with disk,
  194. # permissions, and so forth.
  195. stop-writes-on-bgsave-error yes
  196. # Compress string objects using LZF when dump .rdb databases?
  197. # For default that's set to 'yes' as it's almost always a win.
  198. # If you want to save some CPU in the saving child set it to 'no' but
  199. # the dataset will likely be bigger if you have compressible values or keys.
  200. rdbcompression yes
  201. # Since version 5 of RDB a CRC64 checksum is placed at the end of the file.
  202. # This makes the format more resistant to corruption but there is a performance
  203. # hit to pay (around 10%) when saving and loading RDB files, so you can disable it
  204. # for maximum performances.
  205. #
  206. # RDB files created with checksum disabled have a checksum of zero that will
  207. # tell the loading code to skip the check.
  208. rdbchecksum yes
  209. # The filename where to dump the DB
  210. dbfilename dump.rdb
  211. # The working directory.
  212. #
  213. # The DB will be written inside this directory, with the filename specified
  214. # above using the 'dbfilename' configuration directive.
  215. #
  216. # The Append Only File will also be created inside this directory.
  217. #
  218. # Note that you must specify a directory here, not a file name.
  219. dir /var/lib/redis
  220. ################################# REPLICATION #################################
  221. # Master-Slave replication. Use slaveof to make a Redis instance a copy of
  222. # another Redis server. A few things to understand ASAP about Redis replication.
  223. #
  224. # 1) Redis replication is asynchronous, but you can configure a master to
  225. # stop accepting writes if it appears to be not connected with at least
  226. # a given number of slaves.
  227. # 2) Redis slaves are able to perform a partial resynchronization with the
  228. # master if the replication link is lost for a relatively small amount of
  229. # time. You may want to configure the replication backlog size (see the next
  230. # sections of this file) with a sensible value depending on your needs.
  231. # 3) Replication is automatic and does not need user intervention. After a
  232. # network partition slaves automatically try to reconnect to masters
  233. # and resynchronize with them.
  234. #
  235. # slaveof <masterip> <masterport>
  236. # If the master is password protected (using the "requirepass" configuration
  237. # directive below) it is possible to tell the slave to authenticate before
  238. # starting the replication synchronization process, otherwise the master will
  239. # refuse the slave request.
  240. #
  241. # masterauth <master-password>
  242. # When a slave loses its connection with the master, or when the replication
  243. # is still in progress, the slave can act in two different ways:
  244. #
  245. # 1) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'yes' (the default) the slave will
  246. # still reply to client requests, possibly with out of date data, or the
  247. # data set may just be empty if this is the first synchronization.
  248. #
  249. # 2) if slave-serve-stale-data is set to 'no' the slave will reply with
  250. # an error "SYNC with master in progress" to all the kind of commands
  251. # but to INFO and SLAVEOF.
  252. #
  253. slave-serve-stale-data yes
  254. # You can configure a slave instance to accept writes or not. Writing against
  255. # a slave instance may be useful to store some ephemeral data (because data
  256. # written on a slave will be easily deleted after resync with the master) but
  257. # may also cause problems if clients are writing to it because of a
  258. # misconfiguration.
  259. #
  260. # Since Redis 2.6 by default slaves are read-only.
  261. #
  262. # Note: read only slaves are not designed to be exposed to untrusted clients
  263. # on the internet. It's just a protection layer against misuse of the instance.
  264. # Still a read only slave exports by default all the administrative commands
  265. # such as CONFIG, DEBUG, and so forth. To a limited extent you can improve
  266. # security of read only slaves using 'rename-command' to shadow all the
  267. # administrative / dangerous commands.
  268. slave-read-only yes
  269. # Replication SYNC strategy: disk or socket.
  270. #
  271. # -------------------------------------------------------
  272. # WARNING: DISKLESS REPLICATION IS EXPERIMENTAL CURRENTLY
  273. # -------------------------------------------------------
  274. #
  275. # New slaves and reconnecting slaves that are not able to continue the replication
  276. # process just receiving differences, need to do what is called a "full
  277. # synchronization". An RDB file is transmitted from the master to the slaves.
  278. # The transmission can happen in two different ways:
  279. #
  280. # 1) Disk-backed: The Redis master creates a new process that writes the RDB
  281. # file on disk. Later the file is transferred by the parent
  282. # process to the slaves incrementally.
  283. # 2) Diskless: The Redis master creates a new process that directly writes the
  284. # RDB file to slave sockets, without touching the disk at all.
  285. #
  286. # With disk-backed replication, while the RDB file is generated, more slaves
  287. # can be queued and served with the RDB file as soon as the current child producing
  288. # the RDB file finishes its work. With diskless replication instead once
  289. # the transfer starts, new slaves arriving will be queued and a new transfer
  290. # will start when the current one terminates.
  291. #
  292. # When diskless replication is used, the master waits a configurable amount of
  293. # time (in seconds) before starting the transfer in the hope that multiple slaves
  294. # will arrive and the transfer can be parallelized.
  295. #
  296. # With slow disks and fast (large bandwidth) networks, diskless replication
  297. # works better.
  298. repl-diskless-sync no
  299. # When diskless replication is enabled, it is possible to configure the delay
  300. # the server waits in order to spawn the child that transfers the RDB via socket
  301. # to the slaves.
  302. #
  303. # This is important since once the transfer starts, it is not possible to serve
  304. # new slaves arriving, that will be queued for the next RDB transfer, so the server
  305. # waits a delay in order to let more slaves arrive.
  306. #
  307. # The delay is specified in seconds, and by default is 5 seconds. To disable
  308. # it entirely just set it to 0 seconds and the transfer will start ASAP.
  309. repl-diskless-sync-delay 5
  310. # Slaves send PINGs to server in a predefined interval. It's possible to change
  311. # this interval with the repl_ping_slave_period option. The default value is 10
  312. # seconds.
  313. #
  314. # repl-ping-slave-period 10
  315. # The following option sets the replication timeout for:
  316. #
  317. # 1) Bulk transfer I/O during SYNC, from the point of view of slave.
  318. # 2) Master timeout from the point of view of slaves (data, pings).
  319. # 3) Slave timeout from the point of view of masters (REPLCONF ACK pings).
  320. #
  321. # It is important to make sure that this value is greater than the value
  322. # specified for repl-ping-slave-period otherwise a timeout will be detected
  323. # every time there is low traffic between the master and the slave.
  324. #
  325. # repl-timeout 60
  326. # Disable TCP_NODELAY on the slave socket after SYNC?
  327. #
  328. # If you select "yes" Redis will use a smaller number of TCP packets and
  329. # less bandwidth to send data to slaves. But this can add a delay for
  330. # the data to appear on the slave side, up to 40 milliseconds with
  331. # Linux kernels using a default configuration.
  332. #
  333. # If you select "no" the delay for data to appear on the slave side will
  334. # be reduced but more bandwidth will be used for replication.
  335. #
  336. # By default we optimize for low latency, but in very high traffic conditions
  337. # or when the master and slaves are many hops away, turning this to "yes" may
  338. # be a good idea.
  339. repl-disable-tcp-nodelay no
  340. # Set the replication backlog size. The backlog is a buffer that accumulates
  341. # slave data when slaves are disconnected for some time, so that when a slave
  342. # wants to reconnect again, often a full resync is not needed, but a partial
  343. # resync is enough, just passing the portion of data the slave missed while
  344. # disconnected.
  345. #
  346. # The bigger the replication backlog, the longer the time the slave can be
  347. # disconnected and later be able to perform a partial resynchronization.
  348. #
  349. # The backlog is only allocated once there is at least a slave connected.
  350. #
  351. # repl-backlog-size 1mb
  352. # After a master has no longer connected slaves for some time, the backlog
  353. # will be freed. The following option configures the amount of seconds that
  354. # need to elapse, starting from the time the last slave disconnected, for
  355. # the backlog buffer to be freed.
  356. #
  357. # A value of 0 means to never release the backlog.
  358. #
  359. # repl-backlog-ttl 3600
  360. # The slave priority is an integer number published by Redis in the INFO output.
  361. # It is used by Redis Sentinel in order to select a slave to promote into a
  362. # master if the master is no longer working correctly.
  363. #
  364. # A slave with a low priority number is considered better for promotion, so
  365. # for instance if there are three slaves with priority 10, 100, 25 Sentinel will
  366. # pick the one with priority 10, that is the lowest.
  367. #
  368. # However a special priority of 0 marks the slave as not able to perform the
  369. # role of master, so a slave with priority of 0 will never be selected by
  370. # Redis Sentinel for promotion.
  371. #
  372. # By default the priority is 100.
  373. slave-priority 100
  374. # It is possible for a master to stop accepting writes if there are less than
  375. # N slaves connected, having a lag less or equal than M seconds.
  376. #
  377. # The N slaves need to be in "online" state.
  378. #
  379. # The lag in seconds, that must be <= the specified value, is calculated from
  380. # the last ping received from the slave, that is usually sent every second.
  381. #
  382. # This option does not GUARANTEE that N replicas will accept the write, but
  383. # will limit the window of exposure for lost writes in case not enough slaves
  384. # are available, to the specified number of seconds.
  385. #
  386. # For example to require at least 3 slaves with a lag <= 10 seconds use:
  387. #
  388. # min-slaves-to-write 3
  389. # min-slaves-max-lag 10
  390. #
  391. # Setting one or the other to 0 disables the feature.
  392. #
  393. # By default min-slaves-to-write is set to 0 (feature disabled) and
  394. # min-slaves-max-lag is set to 10.
  395. # A Redis master is able to list the address and port of the attached
  396. # slaves in different ways. For example the "INFO replication" section
  397. # offers this information, which is used, among other tools, by
  398. # Redis Sentinel in order to discover slave instances.
  399. # Another place where this info is available is in the output of the
  400. # "ROLE" command of a masteer.
  401. #
  402. # The listed IP and address normally reported by a slave is obtained
  403. # in the following way:
  404. #
  405. # IP: The address is auto detected by checking the peer address
  406. # of the socket used by the slave to connect with the master.
  407. #
  408. # Port: The port is communicated by the slave during the replication
  409. # handshake, and is normally the port that the slave is using to
  410. # list for connections.
  411. #
  412. # However when port forwarding or Network Address Translation (NAT) is
  413. # used, the slave may be actually reachable via different IP and port
  414. # pairs. The following two options can be used by a slave in order to
  415. # report to its master a specific set of IP and port, so that both INFO
  416. # and ROLE will report those values.
  417. #
  418. # There is no need to use both the options if you need to override just
  419. # the port or the IP address.
  420. #
  421. # slave-announce-ip 5.5.5.5
  422. # slave-announce-port 1234
  423. ################################## SECURITY ###################################
  424. # Require clients to issue AUTH <PASSWORD> before processing any other
  425. # commands. This might be useful in environments in which you do not trust
  426. # others with access to the host running redis-server.
  427. #
  428. # This should stay commented out for backward compatibility and because most
  429. # people do not need auth (e.g. they run their own servers).
  430. #
  431. # Warning: since Redis is pretty fast an outside user can try up to
  432. # 150k passwords per second against a good box. This means that you should
  433. # use a very strong password otherwise it will be very easy to break.
  434. #
  435. requirepass gnuviech
  436. # Command renaming.
  437. #
  438. # It is possible to change the name of dangerous commands in a shared
  439. # environment. For instance the CONFIG command may be renamed into something
  440. # hard to guess so that it will still be available for internal-use tools
  441. # but not available for general clients.
  442. #
  443. # Example:
  444. #
  445. # rename-command CONFIG b840fc02d524045429941cc15f59e41cb7be6c52
  446. #
  447. # It is also possible to completely kill a command by renaming it into
  448. # an empty string:
  449. #
  450. # rename-command CONFIG ""
  451. #
  452. # Please note that changing the name of commands that are logged into the
  453. # AOF file or transmitted to slaves may cause problems.
  454. ################################### LIMITS ####################################
  455. # Set the max number of connected clients at the same time. By default
  456. # this limit is set to 10000 clients, however if the Redis server is not
  457. # able to configure the process file limit to allow for the specified limit
  458. # the max number of allowed clients is set to the current file limit
  459. # minus 32 (as Redis reserves a few file descriptors for internal uses).
  460. #
  461. # Once the limit is reached Redis will close all the new connections sending
  462. # an error 'max number of clients reached'.
  463. #
  464. # maxclients 10000
  465. # Don't use more memory than the specified amount of bytes.
  466. # When the memory limit is reached Redis will try to remove keys
  467. # according to the eviction policy selected (see maxmemory-policy).
  468. #
  469. # If Redis can't remove keys according to the policy, or if the policy is
  470. # set to 'noeviction', Redis will start to reply with errors to commands
  471. # that would use more memory, like SET, LPUSH, and so on, and will continue
  472. # to reply to read-only commands like GET.
  473. #
  474. # This option is usually useful when using Redis as an LRU cache, or to set
  475. # a hard memory limit for an instance (using the 'noeviction' policy).
  476. #
  477. # WARNING: If you have slaves attached to an instance with maxmemory on,
  478. # the size of the output buffers needed to feed the slaves are subtracted
  479. # from the used memory count, so that network problems / resyncs will
  480. # not trigger a loop where keys are evicted, and in turn the output
  481. # buffer of slaves is full with DELs of keys evicted triggering the deletion
  482. # of more keys, and so forth until the database is completely emptied.
  483. #
  484. # In short... if you have slaves attached it is suggested that you set a lower
  485. # limit for maxmemory so that there is some free RAM on the system for slave
  486. # output buffers (but this is not needed if the policy is 'noeviction').
  487. #
  488. # maxmemory <bytes>
  489. # MAXMEMORY POLICY: how Redis will select what to remove when maxmemory
  490. # is reached. You can select among five behaviors:
  491. #
  492. # volatile-lru -> remove the key with an expire set using an LRU algorithm
  493. # allkeys-lru -> remove any key according to the LRU algorithm
  494. # volatile-random -> remove a random key with an expire set
  495. # allkeys-random -> remove a random key, any key
  496. # volatile-ttl -> remove the key with the nearest expire time (minor TTL)
  497. # noeviction -> don't expire at all, just return an error on write operations
  498. #
  499. # Note: with any of the above policies, Redis will return an error on write
  500. # operations, when there are no suitable keys for eviction.
  501. #
  502. # At the date of writing these commands are: set setnx setex append
  503. # incr decr rpush lpush rpushx lpushx linsert lset rpoplpush sadd
  504. # sinter sinterstore sunion sunionstore sdiff sdiffstore zadd zincrby
  505. # zunionstore zinterstore hset hsetnx hmset hincrby incrby decrby
  506. # getset mset msetnx exec sort
  507. #
  508. # The default is:
  509. #
  510. # maxmemory-policy noeviction
  511. # LRU and minimal TTL algorithms are not precise algorithms but approximated
  512. # algorithms (in order to save memory), so you can tune it for speed or
  513. # accuracy. For default Redis will check five keys and pick the one that was
  514. # used less recently, you can change the sample size using the following
  515. # configuration directive.
  516. #
  517. # The default of 5 produces good enough results. 10 Approximates very closely
  518. # true LRU but costs a bit more CPU. 3 is very fast but not very accurate.
  519. #
  520. # maxmemory-samples 5
  521. ############################## APPEND ONLY MODE ###############################
  522. # By default Redis asynchronously dumps the dataset on disk. This mode is
  523. # good enough in many applications, but an issue with the Redis process or
  524. # a power outage may result into a few minutes of writes lost (depending on
  525. # the configured save points).
  526. #
  527. # The Append Only File is an alternative persistence mode that provides
  528. # much better durability. For instance using the default data fsync policy
  529. # (see later in the config file) Redis can lose just one second of writes in a
  530. # dramatic event like a server power outage, or a single write if something
  531. # wrong with the Redis process itself happens, but the operating system is
  532. # still running correctly.
  533. #
  534. # AOF and RDB persistence can be enabled at the same time without problems.
  535. # If the AOF is enabled on startup Redis will load the AOF, that is the file
  536. # with the better durability guarantees.
  537. #
  538. # Please check http://redis.io/topics/persistence for more information.
  539. appendonly no
  540. # The name of the append only file (default: "appendonly.aof")
  541. appendfilename "appendonly.aof"
  542. # The fsync() call tells the Operating System to actually write data on disk
  543. # instead of waiting for more data in the output buffer. Some OS will really flush
  544. # data on disk, some other OS will just try to do it ASAP.
  545. #
  546. # Redis supports three different modes:
  547. #
  548. # no: don't fsync, just let the OS flush the data when it wants. Faster.
  549. # always: fsync after every write to the append only log. Slow, Safest.
  550. # everysec: fsync only one time every second. Compromise.
  551. #
  552. # The default is "everysec", as that's usually the right compromise between
  553. # speed and data safety. It's up to you to understand if you can relax this to
  554. # "no" that will let the operating system flush the output buffer when
  555. # it wants, for better performances (but if you can live with the idea of
  556. # some data loss consider the default persistence mode that's snapshotting),
  557. # or on the contrary, use "always" that's very slow but a bit safer than
  558. # everysec.
  559. #
  560. # More details please check the following article:
  561. # http://antirez.com/post/redis-persistence-demystified.html
  562. #
  563. # If unsure, use "everysec".
  564. # appendfsync always
  565. appendfsync everysec
  566. # appendfsync no
  567. # When the AOF fsync policy is set to always or everysec, and a background
  568. # saving process (a background save or AOF log background rewriting) is
  569. # performing a lot of I/O against the disk, in some Linux configurations
  570. # Redis may block too long on the fsync() call. Note that there is no fix for
  571. # this currently, as even performing fsync in a different thread will block
  572. # our synchronous write(2) call.
  573. #
  574. # In order to mitigate this problem it's possible to use the following option
  575. # that will prevent fsync() from being called in the main process while a
  576. # BGSAVE or BGREWRITEAOF is in progress.
  577. #
  578. # This means that while another child is saving, the durability of Redis is
  579. # the same as "appendfsync none". In practical terms, this means that it is
  580. # possible to lose up to 30 seconds of log in the worst scenario (with the
  581. # default Linux settings).
  582. #
  583. # If you have latency problems turn this to "yes". Otherwise leave it as
  584. # "no" that is the safest pick from the point of view of durability.
  585. no-appendfsync-on-rewrite no
  586. # Automatic rewrite of the append only file.
  587. # Redis is able to automatically rewrite the log file implicitly calling
  588. # BGREWRITEAOF when the AOF log size grows by the specified percentage.
  589. #
  590. # This is how it works: Redis remembers the size of the AOF file after the
  591. # latest rewrite (if no rewrite has happened since the restart, the size of
  592. # the AOF at startup is used).
  593. #
  594. # This base size is compared to the current size. If the current size is
  595. # bigger than the specified percentage, the rewrite is triggered. Also
  596. # you need to specify a minimal size for the AOF file to be rewritten, this
  597. # is useful to avoid rewriting the AOF file even if the percentage increase
  598. # is reached but it is still pretty small.
  599. #
  600. # Specify a percentage of zero in order to disable the automatic AOF
  601. # rewrite feature.
  602. auto-aof-rewrite-percentage 100
  603. auto-aof-rewrite-min-size 64mb
  604. # An AOF file may be found to be truncated at the end during the Redis
  605. # startup process, when the AOF data gets loaded back into memory.
  606. # This may happen when the system where Redis is running
  607. # crashes, especially when an ext4 filesystem is mounted without the
  608. # data=ordered option (however this can't happen when Redis itself
  609. # crashes or aborts but the operating system still works correctly).
  610. #
  611. # Redis can either exit with an error when this happens, or load as much
  612. # data as possible (the default now) and start if the AOF file is found
  613. # to be truncated at the end. The following option controls this behavior.
  614. #
  615. # If aof-load-truncated is set to yes, a truncated AOF file is loaded and
  616. # the Redis server starts emitting a log to inform the user of the event.
  617. # Otherwise if the option is set to no, the server aborts with an error
  618. # and refuses to start. When the option is set to no, the user requires
  619. # to fix the AOF file using the "redis-check-aof" utility before to restart
  620. # the server.
  621. #
  622. # Note that if the AOF file will be found to be corrupted in the middle
  623. # the server will still exit with an error. This option only applies when
  624. # Redis will try to read more data from the AOF file but not enough bytes
  625. # will be found.
  626. aof-load-truncated yes
  627. ################################ LUA SCRIPTING ###############################
  628. # Max execution time of a Lua script in milliseconds.
  629. #
  630. # If the maximum execution time is reached Redis will log that a script is
  631. # still in execution after the maximum allowed time and will start to
  632. # reply to queries with an error.
  633. #
  634. # When a long running script exceeds the maximum execution time only the
  635. # SCRIPT KILL and SHUTDOWN NOSAVE commands are available. The first can be
  636. # used to stop a script that did not yet called write commands. The second
  637. # is the only way to shut down the server in the case a write command was
  638. # already issued by the script but the user doesn't want to wait for the natural
  639. # termination of the script.
  640. #
  641. # Set it to 0 or a negative value for unlimited execution without warnings.
  642. lua-time-limit 5000
  643. ################################ REDIS CLUSTER ###############################
  644. #
  645. # ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
  646. # WARNING EXPERIMENTAL: Redis Cluster is considered to be stable code, however
  647. # in order to mark it as "mature" we need to wait for a non trivial percentage
  648. # of users to deploy it in production.
  649. # ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
  650. #
  651. # Normal Redis instances can't be part of a Redis Cluster; only nodes that are
  652. # started as cluster nodes can. In order to start a Redis instance as a
  653. # cluster node enable the cluster support uncommenting the following:
  654. #
  655. # cluster-enabled yes
  656. # Every cluster node has a cluster configuration file. This file is not
  657. # intended to be edited by hand. It is created and updated by Redis nodes.
  658. # Every Redis Cluster node requires a different cluster configuration file.
  659. # Make sure that instances running in the same system do not have
  660. # overlapping cluster configuration file names.
  661. #
  662. # cluster-config-file nodes-6379.conf
  663. # Cluster node timeout is the amount of milliseconds a node must be unreachable
  664. # for it to be considered in failure state.
  665. # Most other internal time limits are multiple of the node timeout.
  666. #
  667. # cluster-node-timeout 15000
  668. # A slave of a failing master will avoid to start a failover if its data
  669. # looks too old.
  670. #
  671. # There is no simple way for a slave to actually have a exact measure of
  672. # its "data age", so the following two checks are performed:
  673. #
  674. # 1) If there are multiple slaves able to failover, they exchange messages
  675. # in order to try to give an advantage to the slave with the best
  676. # replication offset (more data from the master processed).
  677. # Slaves will try to get their rank by offset, and apply to the start
  678. # of the failover a delay proportional to their rank.
  679. #
  680. # 2) Every single slave computes the time of the last interaction with
  681. # its master. This can be the last ping or command received (if the master
  682. # is still in the "connected" state), or the time that elapsed since the
  683. # disconnection with the master (if the replication link is currently down).
  684. # If the last interaction is too old, the slave will not try to failover
  685. # at all.
  686. #
  687. # The point "2" can be tuned by user. Specifically a slave will not perform
  688. # the failover if, since the last interaction with the master, the time
  689. # elapsed is greater than:
  690. #
  691. # (node-timeout * slave-validity-factor) + repl-ping-slave-period
  692. #
  693. # So for example if node-timeout is 30 seconds, and the slave-validity-factor
  694. # is 10, and assuming a default repl-ping-slave-period of 10 seconds, the
  695. # slave will not try to failover if it was not able to talk with the master
  696. # for longer than 310 seconds.
  697. #
  698. # A large slave-validity-factor may allow slaves with too old data to failover
  699. # a master, while a too small value may prevent the cluster from being able to
  700. # elect a slave at all.
  701. #
  702. # For maximum availability, it is possible to set the slave-validity-factor
  703. # to a value of 0, which means, that slaves will always try to failover the
  704. # master regardless of the last time they interacted with the master.
  705. # (However they'll always try to apply a delay proportional to their
  706. # offset rank).
  707. #
  708. # Zero is the only value able to guarantee that when all the partitions heal
  709. # the cluster will always be able to continue.
  710. #
  711. # cluster-slave-validity-factor 10
  712. # Cluster slaves are able to migrate to orphaned masters, that are masters
  713. # that are left without working slaves. This improves the cluster ability
  714. # to resist to failures as otherwise an orphaned master can't be failed over
  715. # in case of failure if it has no working slaves.
  716. #
  717. # Slaves migrate to orphaned masters only if there are still at least a
  718. # given number of other working slaves for their old master. This number
  719. # is the "migration barrier". A migration barrier of 1 means that a slave
  720. # will migrate only if there is at least 1 other working slave for its master
  721. # and so forth. It usually reflects the number of slaves you want for every
  722. # master in your cluster.
  723. #
  724. # Default is 1 (slaves migrate only if their masters remain with at least
  725. # one slave). To disable migration just set it to a very large value.
  726. # A value of 0 can be set but is useful only for debugging and dangerous
  727. # in production.
  728. #
  729. # cluster-migration-barrier 1
  730. # By default Redis Cluster nodes stop accepting queries if they detect there
  731. # is at least an hash slot uncovered (no available node is serving it).
  732. # This way if the cluster is partially down (for example a range of hash slots
  733. # are no longer covered) all the cluster becomes, eventually, unavailable.
  734. # It automatically returns available as soon as all the slots are covered again.
  735. #
  736. # However sometimes you want the subset of the cluster which is working,
  737. # to continue to accept queries for the part of the key space that is still
  738. # covered. In order to do so, just set the cluster-require-full-coverage
  739. # option to no.
  740. #
  741. # cluster-require-full-coverage yes
  742. # In order to setup your cluster make sure to read the documentation
  743. # available at http://redis.io web site.
  744. ################################## SLOW LOG ###################################
  745. # The Redis Slow Log is a system to log queries that exceeded a specified
  746. # execution time. The execution time does not include the I/O operations
  747. # like talking with the client, sending the reply and so forth,
  748. # but just the time needed to actually execute the command (this is the only
  749. # stage of command execution where the thread is blocked and can not serve
  750. # other requests in the meantime).
  751. #
  752. # You can configure the slow log with two parameters: one tells Redis
  753. # what is the execution time, in microseconds, to exceed in order for the
  754. # command to get logged, and the other parameter is the length of the
  755. # slow log. When a new command is logged the oldest one is removed from the
  756. # queue of logged commands.
  757. # The following time is expressed in microseconds, so 1000000 is equivalent
  758. # to one second. Note that a negative number disables the slow log, while
  759. # a value of zero forces the logging of every command.
  760. slowlog-log-slower-than 10000
  761. # There is no limit to this length. Just be aware that it will consume memory.
  762. # You can reclaim memory used by the slow log with SLOWLOG RESET.
  763. slowlog-max-len 128
  764. ################################ LATENCY MONITOR ##############################
  765. # The Redis latency monitoring subsystem samples different operations
  766. # at runtime in order to collect data related to possible sources of
  767. # latency of a Redis instance.
  768. #
  769. # Via the LATENCY command this information is available to the user that can
  770. # print graphs and obtain reports.
  771. #
  772. # The system only logs operations that were performed in a time equal or
  773. # greater than the amount of milliseconds specified via the
  774. # latency-monitor-threshold configuration directive. When its value is set
  775. # to zero, the latency monitor is turned off.
  776. #
  777. # By default latency monitoring is disabled since it is mostly not needed
  778. # if you don't have latency issues, and collecting data has a performance
  779. # impact, that while very small, can be measured under big load. Latency
  780. # monitoring can easily be enabled at runtime using the command
  781. # "CONFIG SET latency-monitor-threshold <milliseconds>" if needed.
  782. latency-monitor-threshold 0
  783. ############################# EVENT NOTIFICATION ##############################
  784. # Redis can notify Pub/Sub clients about events happening in the key space.
  785. # This feature is documented at http://redis.io/topics/notifications
  786. #
  787. # For instance if keyspace events notification is enabled, and a client
  788. # performs a DEL operation on key "foo" stored in the Database 0, two
  789. # messages will be published via Pub/Sub:
  790. #
  791. # PUBLISH __keyspace@0__:foo del
  792. # PUBLISH __keyevent@0__:del foo
  793. #
  794. # It is possible to select the events that Redis will notify among a set
  795. # of classes. Every class is identified by a single character:
  796. #
  797. # K Keyspace events, published with __keyspace@<db>__ prefix.
  798. # E Keyevent events, published with __keyevent@<db>__ prefix.
  799. # g Generic commands (non-type specific) like DEL, EXPIRE, RENAME, ...
  800. # $ String commands
  801. # l List commands
  802. # s Set commands
  803. # h Hash commands
  804. # z Sorted set commands
  805. # x Expired events (events generated every time a key expires)
  806. # e Evicted events (events generated when a key is evicted for maxmemory)
  807. # A Alias for g$lshzxe, so that the "AKE" string means all the events.
  808. #
  809. # The "notify-keyspace-events" takes as argument a string that is composed
  810. # of zero or multiple characters. The empty string means that notifications
  811. # are disabled.
  812. #
  813. # Example: to enable list and generic events, from the point of view of the
  814. # event name, use:
  815. #
  816. # notify-keyspace-events Elg
  817. #
  818. # Example 2: to get the stream of the expired keys subscribing to channel
  819. # name __keyevent@0__:expired use:
  820. #
  821. # notify-keyspace-events Ex
  822. #
  823. # By default all notifications are disabled because most users don't need
  824. # this feature and the feature has some overhead. Note that if you don't
  825. # specify at least one of K or E, no events will be delivered.
  826. notify-keyspace-events ""
  827. ############################### ADVANCED CONFIG ###############################
  828. # Hashes are encoded using a memory efficient data structure when they have a
  829. # small number of entries, and the biggest entry does not exceed a given
  830. # threshold. These thresholds can be configured using the following directives.
  831. hash-max-ziplist-entries 512
  832. hash-max-ziplist-value 64
  833. # Lists are also encoded in a special way to save a lot of space.
  834. # The number of entries allowed per internal list node can be specified
  835. # as a fixed maximum size or a maximum number of elements.
  836. # For a fixed maximum size, use -5 through -1, meaning:
  837. # -5: max size: 64 Kb <-- not recommended for normal workloads
  838. # -4: max size: 32 Kb <-- not recommended
  839. # -3: max size: 16 Kb <-- probably not recommended
  840. # -2: max size: 8 Kb <-- good
  841. # -1: max size: 4 Kb <-- good
  842. # Positive numbers mean store up to _exactly_ that number of elements
  843. # per list node.
  844. # The highest performing option is usually -2 (8 Kb size) or -1 (4 Kb size),
  845. # but if your use case is unique, adjust the settings as necessary.
  846. list-max-ziplist-size -2
  847. # Lists may also be compressed.
  848. # Compress depth is the number of quicklist ziplist nodes from *each* side of
  849. # the list to *exclude* from compression. The head and tail of the list
  850. # are always uncompressed for fast push/pop operations. Settings are:
  851. # 0: disable all list compression
  852. # 1: depth 1 means "don't start compressing until after 1 node into the list,
  853. # going from either the head or tail"
  854. # So: [head]->node->node->...->node->[tail]
  855. # [head], [tail] will always be uncompressed; inner nodes will compress.
  856. # 2: [head]->[next]->node->node->...->node->[prev]->[tail]
  857. # 2 here means: don't compress head or head->next or tail->prev or tail,
  858. # but compress all nodes between them.
  859. # 3: [head]->[next]->[next]->node->node->...->node->[prev]->[prev]->[tail]
  860. # etc.
  861. list-compress-depth 0
  862. # Sets have a special encoding in just one case: when a set is composed
  863. # of just strings that happen to be integers in radix 10 in the range
  864. # of 64 bit signed integers.
  865. # The following configuration setting sets the limit in the size of the
  866. # set in order to use this special memory saving encoding.
  867. set-max-intset-entries 512
  868. # Similarly to hashes and lists, sorted sets are also specially encoded in
  869. # order to save a lot of space. This encoding is only used when the length and
  870. # elements of a sorted set are below the following limits:
  871. zset-max-ziplist-entries 128
  872. zset-max-ziplist-value 64
  873. # HyperLogLog sparse representation bytes limit. The limit includes the
  874. # 16 bytes header. When an HyperLogLog using the sparse representation crosses
  875. # this limit, it is converted into the dense representation.
  876. #
  877. # A value greater than 16000 is totally useless, since at that point the
  878. # dense representation is more memory efficient.
  879. #
  880. # The suggested value is ~ 3000 in order to have the benefits of
  881. # the space efficient encoding without slowing down too much PFADD,
  882. # which is O(N) with the sparse encoding. The value can be raised to
  883. # ~ 10000 when CPU is not a concern, but space is, and the data set is
  884. # composed of many HyperLogLogs with cardinality in the 0 - 15000 range.
  885. hll-sparse-max-bytes 3000
  886. # Active rehashing uses 1 millisecond every 100 milliseconds of CPU time in
  887. # order to help rehashing the main Redis hash table (the one mapping top-level
  888. # keys to values). The hash table implementation Redis uses (see dict.c)
  889. # performs a lazy rehashing: the more operation you run into a hash table
  890. # that is rehashing, the more rehashing "steps" are performed, so if the
  891. # server is idle the rehashing is never complete and some more memory is used
  892. # by the hash table.
  893. #
  894. # The default is to use this millisecond 10 times every second in order to
  895. # actively rehash the main dictionaries, freeing memory when possible.
  896. #
  897. # If unsure:
  898. # use "activerehashing no" if you have hard latency requirements and it is
  899. # not a good thing in your environment that Redis can reply from time to time
  900. # to queries with 2 milliseconds delay.
  901. #
  902. # use "activerehashing yes" if you don't have such hard requirements but
  903. # want to free memory asap when possible.
  904. activerehashing yes
  905. # The client output buffer limits can be used to force disconnection of clients
  906. # that are not reading data from the server fast enough for some reason (a
  907. # common reason is that a Pub/Sub client can't consume messages as fast as the
  908. # publisher can produce them).
  909. #
  910. # The limit can be set differently for the three different classes of clients:
  911. #
  912. # normal -> normal clients including MONITOR clients
  913. # slave -> slave clients
  914. # pubsub -> clients subscribed to at least one pubsub channel or pattern
  915. #
  916. # The syntax of every client-output-buffer-limit directive is the following:
  917. #
  918. # client-output-buffer-limit <class> <hard limit> <soft limit> <soft seconds>
  919. #
  920. # A client is immediately disconnected once the hard limit is reached, or if
  921. # the soft limit is reached and remains reached for the specified number of
  922. # seconds (continuously).
  923. # So for instance if the hard limit is 32 megabytes and the soft limit is
  924. # 16 megabytes / 10 seconds, the client will get disconnected immediately
  925. # if the size of the output buffers reach 32 megabytes, but will also get
  926. # disconnected if the client reaches 16 megabytes and continuously overcomes
  927. # the limit for 10 seconds.
  928. #
  929. # By default normal clients are not limited because they don't receive data
  930. # without asking (in a push way), but just after a request, so only
  931. # asynchronous clients may create a scenario where data is requested faster
  932. # than it can read.
  933. #
  934. # Instead there is a default limit for pubsub and slave clients, since
  935. # subscribers and slaves receive data in a push fashion.
  936. #
  937. # Both the hard or the soft limit can be disabled by setting them to zero.
  938. client-output-buffer-limit normal 0 0 0
  939. client-output-buffer-limit slave 256mb 64mb 60
  940. client-output-buffer-limit pubsub 32mb 8mb 60
  941. # Redis calls an internal function to perform many background tasks, like
  942. # closing connections of clients in timeout, purging expired keys that are
  943. # never requested, and so forth.
  944. #
  945. # Not all tasks are performed with the same frequency, but Redis checks for
  946. # tasks to perform according to the specified "hz" value.
  947. #
  948. # By default "hz" is set to 10. Raising the value will use more CPU when
  949. # Redis is idle, but at the same time will make Redis more responsive when
  950. # there are many keys expiring at the same time, and timeouts may be
  951. # handled with more precision.
  952. #
  953. # The range is between 1 and 500, however a value over 100 is usually not
  954. # a good idea. Most users should use the default of 10 and raise this up to
  955. # 100 only in environments where very low latency is required.
  956. hz 10
  957. # When a child rewrites the AOF file, if the following option is enabled
  958. # the file will be fsync-ed every 32 MB of data generated. This is useful
  959. # in order to commit the file to the disk more incrementally and avoid
  960. # big latency spikes.
  961. aof-rewrite-incremental-fsync yes